NRA

Where Freedom Lives There Is My Country!

humanoidhistory:

Lightning strikes the canyons of Santa Clarita, California, September 1958.

Reblogged from humanoidhistory

humanoidhistory:

Lightning strikes the canyons of Santa Clarita, California, September 1958.

doyoulikevintage:

Lusse Auto-Scooter 1953 Police car vl

Reblogged from hb64-deactivated20140719

doyoulikevintage:

Lusse Auto-Scooter 1953 Police car vl

chicagotribune:

World Cup party underway before kickoff
Who are you cheering for?

Reblogged from chicagotribune

chicagotribune:

World Cup party underway before kickoff

Who are you cheering for?

Reblogged from peashooter85

peashooter85:

A gold inlaid 11mm Gasser revolver crafted by “Miller & Val. Greiss of Munich” for Prince Ludwig Ferdinand of Bavaria, late 19th century.

Sold at Auction: $25,000

peashooter85:

Factory demonstration cutaway M1 Garand semi auto rifle, World War II.

Reblogged from peashooter85

peashooter85:

Factory demonstration cutaway M1 Garand semi auto rifle, World War II.

Reblogged from fuckyeahdirectors

"…we all wanted to create something that wasn’t flaunting our own department or our own artistic sides…It feels like when people connect with this movie, they are connecting for the reason of like everybody’s combined passion for it, which is cool and for me personally this journey has been, because of the conversations that I’ve been able to have, it feels like the movie creates an environment that makes people want to have somewhat personal conversations afterwards. That’s been really touching and moving for me." - Destin Daniel Cretton (x)

(Source: ofmotionpictures)

chicagotribune:

Bull run gets fans on, and off, their feet at Hawthorne
David Sturms walked onto the soggy horse track wearing white pants, a white shirt and a red belt fashioned from scraps of his daughter’s prom dress.
Sturms, one of three friends with dreams of running with the famed bulls of Pamplona, Spain, had something close to a dress rehearsal Saturday in the west suburbs

Reblogged from chicagotribune

chicagotribune:

Bull run gets fans on, and off, their feet at Hawthorne

David Sturms walked onto the soggy horse track wearing white pants, a white shirt and a red belt fashioned from scraps of his daughter’s prom dress.

Sturms, one of three friends with dreams of running with the famed bulls of Pamplona, Spain, had something close to a dress rehearsal Saturday in the west suburbs

brookhavenlab:

Supernova remnants are impossibly stunning. Exploding stars fling a ridiculous amount of energy out across the cosmos, giving us killer images like the one above.
But supernovae also send out extremely energetic charged particles, which can strike and damage cells. Ol’ Mother Earth protects us with a luscious atmosphere and powerful magnetic field, but deep space explorers aren’t so lucky. Astronauts traveling beyond Earth’s orbit are exposed to these powerful, star-born cosmic rays. So how do we protect them and evaluate the risks?

Well, clearly you can’t just send a person out into space and see how long it takes them to develop cancer. So what we work with at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory are many experiments with different cell types that we expose to this type of radiation here on Earth—and then we use a lot of mathematical manipulations to extrapolate our data into the health risks for people.

That’s molecular biologist Peter Guida in a great Popular Mechanics (popmech) interview on the threat to Mars explorers. Guida works at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory here at Brookhaven Lab, using our accelerators to safely simulate the ion beams blazing through deep space. Go read the whole thing.

Reblogged from humanoidhistory

brookhavenlab:

Supernova remnants are impossibly stunning. Exploding stars fling a ridiculous amount of energy out across the cosmos, giving us killer images like the one above.

But supernovae also send out extremely energetic charged particles, which can strike and damage cells. Ol’ Mother Earth protects us with a luscious atmosphere and powerful magnetic field, but deep space explorers aren’t so lucky. Astronauts traveling beyond Earth’s orbit are exposed to these powerful, star-born cosmic rays. So how do we protect them and evaluate the risks?

Well, clearly you can’t just send a person out into space and see how long it takes them to develop cancer. So what we work with at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory are many experiments with different cell types that we expose to this type of radiation here on Earth—and then we use a lot of mathematical manipulations to extrapolate our data into the health risks for people.

That’s molecular biologist Peter Guida in a great Popular Mechanics (popmechinterview on the threat to Mars explorers. Guida works at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory here at Brookhaven Lab, using our accelerators to safely simulate the ion beams blazing through deep space. Go read the whole thing.

Dear Followers, my series on Robert the Bruce is almost done.

Reblogged from peashooter85

peashooter85:

peashooter85:

Only one more post to make for the conclusion.  In the meantime, lets vote on the next topic shall we? Please only vote for only one, and by ONE I mean ONE and only ONE.  Multiple votes or listings will be disqualified.

The Year of the Five Emperors (Ancient Rome)

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

Napoleon’s invasion of Russia

The Soviet Invasion of Manchuria

Blackbeard the Pirate

So, what shall it be?

Voting ends when I post the last of the Bruce series

Reblogged from peashooter85

ancientart:

A quick look at: the genius. What was the genius, and how can we view this aspect of Roman domestic religion in ancient art?

genius (pl. genii) was the divine spirit which the Romans believed every human male was born with; the corresponding guardian spirit in women was called Juno. The genius of the male watched over him throughout his life, and enabled him to beget children. The significance of the genius took on particular importance due to the structure of Roman families.

The Roman family was centered around the paterfamilias, whom was the oldest male member of the family. Everyone within this family was under his control. No major decisions of the family were made without the consent of the paterfamilias, he had control over the property of the family, and for much of Roman history, he had the power of life and death over members of his household. Thus, understandably, the wellbeing of the genius of the paterfamilias was crucial for his entire family, particularly as it was thought to guide the decisions he made. Members of the family would give offerings, and make appeals to the genius of the paterfamilias. Offerings were made on domestic altars (larariums), which nearly every Roman household possessed.

These larariums were usually built in the atrium or kitchen of the home (for an example of a lararium, see this photo from the House of Golden Cupids), and would contain a statuette of the genius (photos 2 & 3). Larariums could also be painted, such as shown in the House of the Vettii at Pompeii (photo 1). Here, we can see the genius figure in the middle, with two lares (household guardian spirits) on either side, to whom offerings were also made. The house snake was also a symbol of the genius, and is often present iconographically in Roman domestic art. These genius figures, be it statuette or painting, are typically depicted as a young, veiled man wearing a toga, whom usually holds a patera and/ or a cornucopia.

The first image is taken by Patricio Lorente via the Wiki Commons, and the shown statuette is courtesy of the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA (54.2329). This figure is made of bronze with silver inlay, and dates to the 1st century.